Node.js v6.0.0-nightly201602102848f84332 Documentation


Assert#

Stability: 3 - Locked

The assert module provides a simple set of assertion tests that can be used to test invariants. The module is intended for internal use by Node.js, but can be used in application code via require('assert'). However, assert is not a testing framework, and is not intended to be used as a general purpose assertion library.

The API for the assert module is Locked. This means that there will be no additions or changes to any of the methods implemented and exposed by the module.

assert(value[, message])#

An alias of assert.ok() .

const assert = require('assert');

assert(true);  // OK
assert(1);     // OK
assert(false);
  // throws "AssertionError: false == true"
assert(0);
  // throws "AssertionError: 0 == true"
assert(false, 'it\'s false');
  // throws "AssertionError: it's false"

assert.deepEqual(actual, expected[, message])#

Tests for deep equality between the actual and expected parameters. Primitive values are compared with the equal comparison operator ( == ).

Only enumerable "own" properties are considered. The deepEqual() implementation does not test object prototypes, attached symbols, or non-enumerable properties. This can lead to some potentially surprising results. For example, the following example does not throw an AssertionError because the properties on the Error object are non-enumerable:

// WARNING: This does not throw an AssertionError!
assert.deepEqual(Error('a'), Error('b'));

"Deep" equality means that the enumerable "own" properties of child objects are evaluated also:

const assert = require('assert');

const obj1 = {
  a : {
    b : 1
  }
};
const obj2 = {
  a : {
    b : 2
  }
};
const obj3 = {
  a : {
    b : 1
  }
}
const obj4 = Object.create(obj1);

assert.deepEqual(obj1, obj1);
  // OK, object is equal to itself

assert.deepEqual(obj1, obj2);
  // AssertionError: { a: { b: 1 } } deepEqual { a: { b: 2 } }
  // values of b are different

assert.deepEqual(obj1, obj3);
  // OK, objects are equal

assert.deepEqual(obj1, obj4);
  // AssertionError: { a: { b: 1 } } deepEqual {}
  // Prototypes are ignored

If the values are not equal, an AssertionError is thrown with a message property set equal to the value of the message parameter. If the message parameter is undefined, a default error message is assigned.

assert.deepStrictEqual(actual, expected[, message])#

Generally identical to assert.deepEqual() with the exception that primitive values are compared using the strict equality operator ( === ).

const assert = require('assert');

assert.deepEqual({a:1}, {a:'1'});
  // OK, because 1 == '1'

assert.deepStrictEqual({a:1}, {a:'1'});
  // AssertionError: { a: 1 } deepStrictEqual { a: '1' }
  // because 1 !== '1' using strict equality

If the values are not equal, an AssertionError is thrown with a message property set equal to the value of the message parameter. If the message parameter is undefined, a default error message is assigned.

assert.doesNotThrow(block[, error][, message])#

Asserts that the function block does not throw an error. See assert.throws() for more details.

When assert.doesNotThrow() is called, it will immediately call the block function.

If an error is thrown and it is the same type as that specified by the error parameter, then an AssertionError is thrown. If the error is of a different type, or if the error parameter is undefined, the error is propagated back to the caller.

The following, for instance, will throw the TypeError because there is no matching error type in the assertion:

assert.doesNotThrow(
  () => {
    throw new TypeError('Wrong value');
  },
  SyntaxError
);

However, the following will result in an AssertionError with the message 'Got unwanted exception (TypeError)..':

assert.doesNotThrow(
  () => {
    throw new TypeError('Wrong value');
  },
  TypeError
);

If an AssertionError is thrown and a value is provided for the message parameter, the value of message will be appended to the AssertionError message:

assert.doesNotThrow(
  () => {
    throw new TypeError('Wrong value');
  },
  TypeError,
  'Whoops'
);
// Throws: AssertionError: Got unwanted exception (TypeError). Whoops

assert.equal(actual, expected[, message])#

Tests shallow, coercive equality between the actual and expected parameters using the equal comparison operator ( == ).

const assert = require('assert');

assert.equal(1, 1);
  // OK, 1 == 1
assert.equal(1, '1');
  // OK, 1 == '1'

assert.equal(1, 2);
  // AssertionError: 1 == 2
assert.equal({a: {b: 1}}, {a: {b: 1}});
  //AssertionError: { a: { b: 1 } } == { a: { b: 1 } }

If the values are not equal, an AssertionError is thrown with a message property set equal to the value of the message parameter. If the message parameter is undefined, a default error message is assigned.

assert.fail(actual, expected, message, operator)#

Throws an AssertionError. If message is falsy, the error message is set as the values of actual and expected separated by the provided operator. Otherwise, the error message is the value of message.

const assert = require('assert');

assert.fail(1, 2, undefined, '>');
  // AssertionError: 1 > 2

assert.fail(1, 2, 'whoops', '>');
  // AssertionError: whoops

assert.ifError(value)#

Throws value if value is truthy. This is useful when testing the error argument in callbacks.

const assert = require('assert');

assert.ifError(0); // OK
assert.ifError(1); // Throws 1
assert.ifError('error') // Throws 'error'
assert.ifError(new Error()); // Throws Error

assert.notDeepEqual(actual, expected[, message])#

Tests for any deep inequality. Opposite of assert.deepEqual().

const assert = require('assert');

const obj1 = {
  a : {
    b : 1
  }
};
const obj2 = {
  a : {
    b : 2
  }
};
const obj3 = {
  a : {
    b : 1
  }
}
const obj4 = Object.create(obj1);

assert.notDeepEqual(obj1, obj1);
  // AssertionError: { a: { b: 1 } } notDeepEqual { a: { b: 1 } }

assert.notDeepEqual(obj1, obj2);
  // OK, obj1 and obj2 are not deeply equal

assert.notDeepEqual(obj1, obj3);
  // AssertionError: { a: { b: 1 } } notDeepEqual { a: { b: 1 } }

assert.notDeepEqual(obj1, obj4);
  // OK, obj1 and obj2 are not deeply equal

If the values are deeply equal, an AssertionError is thrown with a message property set equal to the value of the message parameter. If the message parameter is undefined, a default error message is assigned.

assert.notDeepStrictEqual(actual, expected[, message])#

Tests for deep strict inequality. Opposite of assert.deepStrictEqual().

const assert = require('assert');

assert.notDeepEqual({a:1}, {a:'1'});
  // AssertionError: { a: 1 } notDeepEqual { a: '1' }

assert.notDeepStrictEqual({a:1}, {a:'1'});
  // OK

If the values are deeply and strictly equal, an AssertionError is thrown with a message property set equal to the value of the message parameter. If the message parameter is undefined, a default error message is assigned.

assert.notEqual(actual, expected[, message])#

Tests shallow, coercive inequality with the not equal comparison operator ( != ).

const assert = require('assert');

assert.notEqual(1, 2);
  // OK

assert.notEqual(1, 1);
  // AssertionError: 1 != 1

assert.notEqual(1, '1');
  // AssertionError: 1 != '1'

If the values are equal, an AssertionError is thrown with a message property set equal to the value of the message parameter. If the message parameter is undefined, a default error message is assigned.

assert.notStrictEqual(actual, expected[, message])#

Tests strict inequality as determined by the strict not equal operator ( !== ).

const assert = require('assert');

assert.notStrictEqual(1, 2);
  // OK

assert.notStrictEqual(1, 1);
  // AssertionError: 1 != 1

assert.notStrictEqual(1, '1');
  // OK

If the values are strictly equal, an AssertionError is thrown with a message property set equal to the value of the message parameter. If the message parameter is undefined, a default error message is assigned.

assert.ok(value[, message])#

Tests if value is truthy. It is equivalent to assert.equal(!!value, true, message).

If value is not truthy, an AssertionError is thrown with a message property set equal to the value of the message parameter. If the message parameter is undefined, a default error message is assigned.

const assert = require('assert');

assert.ok(true);  // OK
assert.ok(1);     // OK
assert.ok(false);
  // throws "AssertionError: false == true"
assert.ok(0);
  // throws "AssertionError: 0 == true"
assert.ok(false, 'it\'s false');
  // throws "AssertionError: it's false"

assert.strictEqual(actual, expected[, message])#

Tests strict equality as determined by the strict equality operator ( === ).

const assert = require('assert');

assert.strictEqual(1, 2);
  // AssertionError: 1 === 2

assert.strictEqual(1, 1);
  // OK

assert.strictEqual(1, '1');
  // AssertionError: 1 === '1'

If the values are not strictly equal, an AssertionError is thrown with a message property set equal to the value of the message parameter. If the message parameter is undefined, a default error message is assigned.

assert.throws(block[, error][, message])#

Expects the function block to throw an error. If specified, error can be a constructor, RegExp, or validation function.

Validate instanceof using constructor:

assert.throws(
  () => {
    throw new Error('Wrong value');
  },
  Error
);

Validate error message using RegExp:

assert.throws(
  () => {
    throw new Error('Wrong value');
  },
  /value/
);

Custom error validation:

assert.throws(
  () => {
    throw new Error('Wrong value');
  },
  function(err) {
    if ( (err instanceof Error) && /value/.test(err) ) {
      return true;
    }
  },
  'unexpected error'
);